GIMMI

GIVE ME A HAND. GIVE ME YOUR HAND

BASED ON PEER EDUCATION AIDS PREVENTION PROGRAM FOR EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

DESIGNED BY DR Z HALAT
 consultant medical epidemiology consultant

formerly senior medical officer in Kenya,  head of sexually transmitted diseases out-patient clinic of the Central Province General Hospital in Nyeri, the heart of Kikuyuland, Kenya, deputy minister of health in Poland responsible for HIV/AIDS prevention and control, Red Cross volunteer and regional chairman, and head of anonymous HIV/AIDS counselling unit

GIMMI

G

I
M
M
I

GIMMI

read AIDSNEWS article

I LIVE IN AFRICA
AND DON'T WONNA
DIE OF AIDS
GIVE ME A HAND

GIVE ME YOUR HAND

Give me your hand
 
 

HIV positive i.e., the AIDS virus infected and rarely showing any signs or symptoms adolescents and young adults 15 - 24 years old in 36 countries where HIV infection prevalence among females and/or males 15 - 24 years old in the year 2009 was higher than 1  in 100 i.e, 1%

HIV positive i.e., the AIDS virus infected
and rarely showing any signs or symptoms
adolescents and young adults 15 - 24 years old
in 36 countries where HIV infection prevalence
among females and/or males 15 - 24 years old
in the year 2009 was higher than 1 in 100 i.e, 1%

Source of numerical data:
Human Development Report 2011
Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Gender inequality in HIV infection prevalence in adolescents and young adults 15-24 years old in 144 countries in the year 2009 Difference in percentages (female minus male prevalence)

Gender inequality in HIV infection prevalence
in adolescents and young adults 15-24 years old
in 144 countries in the year 2009
Difference in percentages (female minus male prevalence)

Source of numerical data:
Human Development Report 2011
Sustainability and Equity: A Better Future for All
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Country UNDP 2011:
Percent of HIV infected
15 - 24 years old
Females Males
Swaziland 15.6% 6.5%
Lesotho 14.2% 5.4%
South Africa 13.6% 4.5%
Botswana 11.8% 5.2%
Zambia 8.9% 4.2%
Mozambique 8.6% 3.1%
Zimbabwe 6.9% 3.3%
Malawi 6.8% 3.1%
Namibia 5.8% 2.3%
Equatorial Guinea 5.0% 1.9%
Uganda 4.8% 2.3%
Kenya 4.1% 1.8%
Tanzania (United Republic of) 3.9% 1.7%
Cameroon 3.9% 1.6%
Gabon 3.5% 1.4%
Bahamas 3.1% 1.4%
Nigeria 2.9% 1.2%
Congo 2.6% 1.2%
Chad 2.5% 1.0%
Gambia 2.4% 0.9%
Central African Republic 2.2% 1.0%
Togo 2.2% 0.9%
Burundi 2.1% 1.0%
Guinea-Bissau 2.0% 0.8%
Rwanda 1.9% 1.3%
Djibouti 1.9% 0.8%
Belize 1.8% 0.7%
Angola 1.6% 0.6%
Côte d'Ivoire 1.5% 0.7%
Sierra Leone 1.5% 0.6%
Haiti 1.3% 0.6%
Ghana 1.3% 0.5%
Sudan 1.3% 0.5%
Barbados 1.1% 0.9%
Guinea 0.9% 0.4%
Guyana 0.8% 0.6%
Burkina Faso 0.8% 0.5%
Papua New Guinea 0.8% 0.3%
Trinidad and Tobago 0.7% 1.0%
Jamaica 0.7% 1.0%
Dominican Republic 0.7% 0.3%
Senegal 0.7% 0.3%
Benin 0.7% 0.3%
Liberia 0.7% 0.3%
Somalia 0.6% 0.4%
Mali 0.5% 0.2%
Niger 0.5% 0.2%
Suriname 0.4% 0.6%
Eritrea 0.4% 0.2%
Guatemala 0.3% 0.5%
Panama 0.3% 0.4%
El Salvador 0.3% 0.4%
Mauritania 0.3% 0.4%
Myanmar 0.3% 0.3%
Russian Federation 0.3% 0.2%
Ukraine 0.3% 0.2%
United States 0.2% 0.3%
Austria 0.2% 0.3%
Estonia 0.2% 0.3%
Portugal 0.2% 0.3%
Argentina 0.2% 0.3%
Uruguay 0.2% 0.3%
Mauritius 0.2% 0.3%
Honduras 0.2% 0.3%
Ecuador 0.2% 0.2%
Kazakhstan 0.2% 0.1%
Lao People's Democratic Republic 0.2% 0.1%
Switzerland 0.1% 0.2%
France 0.1% 0.2%
Spain 0.1% 0.2%
United Kingdom 0.1% 0.2%
Latvia 0.1% 0.2%
Chile 0.1% 0.2%
Mexico 0.1% 0.2%
Costa Rica 0.1% 0.2%
Peru 0.1% 0.2%
Colombia 0.1% 0.2%
Paraguay 0.1% 0.2%
Nepal 0.1% 0.2%
Australia 0.1% 0.1%
Canada 0.1% 0.1%
Ireland 0.1% 0.1%
Iceland 0.1% 0.1%
Denmark 0.1% 0.1%
Luxembourg 0.1% 0.1%
Greece 0.1% 0.1%
Cuba 0.1% 0.1%
Serbia 0.1% 0.1%
Fiji 0.1% 0.1%
Bolivia (Plurinational State of) 0.1% 0.1%
Moldova (Republic of) 0.1% 0.1%
Kyrgyzstan 0.1% 0.1%
Viet Nam 0.1% 0.1%
Nicaragua 0.1% 0.1%
Morocco 0.1% 0.1%
India 0.1% 0.1%
Cambodia 0.1% 0.1%
Madagascar 0.1% 0.1%
Belarus 0.1% <0.1%
Azerbaijan 0.1% <0.1%
Netherlands <0.1% 0.1%
Germany <0.1% 0.1%
Israel <0.1% 0.1%
Finland <0.1% 0.1%
Romania <0.1% 0.1%
Malaysia <0.1% 0.1%
Lebanon <0.1% 0.1%
Algeria <0.1% 0.1%
Indonesia <0.1% 0.1%
Bhutan <0.1% 0.1%
Pakistan <0.1% 0.1%
Norway <0.1% <0.1%
New Zealand <0.1% <0.1%
Sweden <0.1% <0.1%
Japan <0.1% <0.1%
Korea (Republic of) <0.1% <0.1%
Belgium <0.1% <0.1%
Slovenia <0.1% <0.1%
Italy <0.1% <0.1%
Singapore <0.1% <0.1%
Czech Republic <0.1% <0.1%
Slovakia <0.1% <0.1%
Malta <0.1% <0.1%
Qatar <0.1% <0.1%
Hungary <0.1% <0.1%
Poland <0.1% <0.1%
Lithuania <0.1% <0.1%
Croatia <0.1% <0.1%
Bulgaria <0.1% <0.1%
Georgia <0.1% <0.1%
Armenia <0.1% <0.1%
Iran (Islamic Republic of) <0.1% <0.1%
Oman <0.1% <0.1%
Turkey <0.1% <0.1%
Tunisia <0.1% <0.1%
Sri Lanka <0.1% <0.1%
Maldives <0.1% <0.1%
Mongolia <0.1% <0.1%
Philippines <0.1% <0.1%
Egypt <0.1% <0.1%
Uzbekistan <0.1% <0.1%
Tajikistan <0.1% <0.1%
Bangladesh <0.1% <0.1%
Comoros <0.1% <0.1%





 
For the sake of the new millennium generations

The first new millennium born teens will celebrate their 13th birthday on January 1st, 2014. There are circa 1,500 days until January 1st, 2014. Many of the tens of millions of year 2001 born children have been already irreversibly infected and mutilated, tortured physically and mentally, robbed of their virginity and converted to sex toys of perverts. But the vast majority are still waiting, unknowingly, for their chance to enter adulthood  spared from deadly disease and crippling disability. Within the 1,500 coming days, let us become people of good will who really try hard to initiate the great shift of consciousness for the sake of the new millennium generations.

Dear friends,
Below, please find public health arguments to convince yourself, your loved ones, others like you, and the rest of the world.
Should you find your role in the VIRGINS UNTIL MARRIAGE -  CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANIZATION OF  THE AFRICAN UNION AND THE EUROPEAN UNION project promising/satisfying/profitable
enough, please do not hesitate, dear friends, to use social networking tools
(Click to join Virgins_until_Marriage).
dr Z Halat, medical epidemiology consultant, noxologist

dr Z Halat, medical epidemiology consultant, noxologist

Project designer, Virgins until Marriage
 -  Civil Society Organization of  the African Union and the European Union

Chairman, The John Snow International Society for Common Sense in Public Health


Free service starts on December 1st
to mark  World  AIDS  Day  2009
and promote the AB (and C, if necessary)
strategy of HIV prevention
dr Halat Online - online medical consultation and advice
Skype address: dr.halat.online
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Epidemiology:

the study (health surveys, observation, hypothesis testing, analytic research, and experiments)
of the distribution (analysis by time, place, and classes of persons affected)
and determinants (physical, biological, social, cultural, and behavioural factors that influence health)
of health-related states or events (diseases, causes of death, behaviour such as promiscuity, other social pathologies, reactions to preventive regimens)
in specified populations (identifiable characteristics such as precisely defined numbers)
and the application of this study to control health problems (to promote, protect, and restore health)
prof. J Last

Noxology:
Noxology, health hazards science, is a branch of epidemiology and is the scientific study of  harmful factors, taking into account a number of usually ignored aspects of the health hazards impact on humans, which include varied susceptibility of individuals (families, communities, nations) to a harmful factor acting alone or together with others, exhibiting a synergistic effects on health.  In noxology, the starting point of the diagnostic process is the cause of health-related states or events investigated on individual, family, community, national, or global level (compare: Posita causa, ponitur effectus and Nihil fit sine causa).
dr Z Halat





 

GIMMI
 

HOW COME ALL OF YOU
WATCH US DYING OUT?
I DON'T WANNA
GET INFECTED
GIMMI YOUR HAND

People living with HIV/AIDS Per cent of adults age 15 - 49 

1999 Ranking of 41 countries in which the rate exceeded 2.0%
see data

A SHARE OF PEOPLE LIVING IN THE NINE COUNTRIES
OF EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA
(BOTSWANA, KENYA, LESOTHO, MALAWI, NAMIBIA,
SOUTH AFRICA, SWAZILAND, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE)
IN DEMOGRAPHY AND HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC
OF THE WORLD AND SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
see data

PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS IN THE NINE COUNTRIES
OF EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA
(BOTSWANA, KENYA, LESOTHO, MALAWI, NAMIBIA,
SOUTH AFRICA, SWAZILAND, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE)
IN 1997 AND 1999
PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
AMONG ALL ADULTS AGE 15 - 49
see data

Washington Post, November 8, 1997

Wife Inheritance Spurs AIDS Rise in Kenya

Stephen Buckley 

Mildred Bwire Auma

Carol Guzy -- TWP
Mildred Bwire Auma's first husband died of AIDS after infecting her. She married his brother in accordance with local tradition, but he died of AIDS two years later, after infecting two other women.

It was the summer of 1990, and Mildred Bwire Auma faced a deadly scenario. 

Her husband had just succumbed to AIDS. She knew he had infected her. Now her in-laws clamored for her to allow one of her husband's brothers to make her his responsibility, as tradition here has long dictated. 

Auma, then 28, could scorn tradition, be driven from her community and face starvation with her three children. Or she could marry a brother-in-law, feed her offspring, protect her property — and pass on the virus. 

She chose the brother-in-law. He died of AIDS two years later, but not before infecting two other women. Then they both died. 

Another man has since inherited Auma, and when she was recently interviewed, she was nine months pregnant with his child. 

She says she knows the child may have the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS. And she knows that the disease will likely kill her inheritor. Just as it will soon kill her. "Because of the customs . . . I had to be inherited," Auma says through a translator. "They would have forced me. I would have been alone, homeless." 

Here in western Kenya, the custom known as wife inheritance once held an honorable promise: A community would take care of a widow and her children. She did not remarry. Her husband's family simply took responsibility for her. If a brother-in-law could not care for her, then a cousin or a respected outsider would. The inheritor made sure that the widow and her children were fed, clothed, sheltered, educated, protected, kept. 

He could only take on a widow if he had a family. His first wife would accept the arrangement because tradition frowned on his having sexual relations with his inherited one. 

The system worked until the inheritors began to shun that taboo. They had sex with the widows and that helped HIV explode throughout central and East Africa. 

One out of every eight people afflicted with AIDS lives in sub-Saharan Africa, where in some countries 10 percent of the population is HIV-positive. In some nations, such as Rwanda, the HIV rate in large towns and cities is as high as 25 percent. 

Some countries, such as Uganda, have begun to make inroads against the disease, but many others, such as Kenya, have struggled to convince people that some traditions may also be deadly. 

Pervasive as it has been, however, AIDS did not kill the tradition of widow inheritance. Men, often seeking to cheat widows out of land, have continued to inherit them. Widows, shackled by poverty, have continued to rely on inheritors to take care of them. 

A number of this country's 40-plus tribes embrace the tradition, but it is especially popular among groups that dominate western Kenya. The region has the highest rate of HIV and AIDS in Kenya in part because wife inheritance allows the disease to grow exponentially, says Omondi Magunga, who directs the Kenyan government's efforts to attack AIDS. 

An inheritor has his own family. He infects his first wife and the widow he has inherited. Then he dies, and two other men inherit the women he leaves behind. Those men die. And then their widows are inherited. 

"It's a terrible cycle," Magunga says. "You will tell [a family] that the husband died of AIDS, and the woman is probably very sick, but they say someone must [inherit] the wife. They say tradition must be followed." 

Most widows in places like Busia possess little education, have no property, do not hold jobs and do not have the skills to easily find one. They must choose, one AIDS activist says, "to [be inherited] and be infected and have food, or you starve." 

Auma, of course, chose to save herself and her three children. And essential to that effort was saving the three acres of land she had taken over after her husband's death. 

After her first inheritor died, her in-laws threatened to kill her if she did not relinquish the property. 

She got the deed rewritten in her name, but her in-laws still tried to push her from the property. So when Africanus Auma offered to take her in on his land, within sight of her property, she accepted. 

"It was one way for me to stay near the farm," and be protected, she says. 

Before she accepted, she told her inheritor that she was sick. 

"You are aware of my first husband?" she asked Africanus. 

"Yes," he said. 

"You are aware of my first inheritor?" 

"Yes," he said. "But I still want to take you." 

They slaughtered a goat and had a feast. Africanus officially became her new inheritor. Mildred is not entirely displeased with her decision. Her property is safe, and her children will take it upon her death. It was important for her "to secure something . . . for the children," she says. 

The practice of wife inheritance is one reason Busia district, 220 miles west of Kenya's capital, Nairobi, is reeling from AIDS. The infection rate in its towns runs about 30 percent, Magunga says. The rate in Busia's villages is 14 to 16 percent. 

It seems there is a grave in nearly every yard in Busia. Empty concrete houses and huts are scattered across the district. 

A thriving commercial sex business has made Busia especially vulnerable. The town is often the last stop for truckers who sometimes arrive here after weeks on the road. The fishermen from nearby Lake Victoria also contribute to the prostitutes' trade. 

Many of those prostitutes infect men who live in Busia. And many of those men infect their wives. 

The cycle is fed by denial. Widows afflicted with HIV say they are suffering from malaria, and inheritors often refuse to believe that the widow's husband died of AIDS. Widows and inheritors sometimes will insist that "witchcraft" killed the husband. 

Such denial simplified Alice Ayako's decision when Benson Kwendo Amakutwa offered to inherit her last year after AIDS killed her husband. Ayako has three children, two of whom are grown. She does not plead poverty. "I wanted a companion," she says. 

During an interview in their hut, Amakutwa and Ayako sit with a chair between them. They do not look at each other. Ayako's eyes are pinned to the floor, and Amakutwa, a muscular man with a ragged mustache and goatee, picks at his fingernails. 

"Stephen did not die of AIDS," Ayako blurts out, speaking through a translator. "He was bewitched. He was a village elder, and some people were against him, so I think his death came from witchcraft. I heard that he died of AIDS, but I don't believe." 

Amakutwa adds: "I don't believe. No one knows what disease another man has in his body. Only Jesus knows." Amakutwa, who has five children from his wife, says he is still "together" with her. He does not think he is putting her at risk. "I don't think she will be sick," he says. 

Traditionally, there are few alternatives for widows in this region: Those who scoff at inheritance usually are banished from their communities. 

Dorothy Anyango, coordinator of Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya, knows one widow who refused to marry her brother-in-law and was forced from the community with her children. The woman never returned. She died and suffered the ultimate insult: She was denied burial in her home village. 

The desperate straits of women in western Kenya have compelled Anyango's group, and others, to start programs to help women generate income. "We tell them to make sure they have their own cattle, their own goats," says Nakudi Mugeni, deputy chairwoman of a Busia women's organization. "That way, when they need money, they have something to sell." 

Anyango and Mugeni say ignorance is not Busia's problem. People such as Omuko and Amakutwa know AIDS exists. "You get the virus from somebody else when you [have sex] with someone who has that disease," Amakutwa says. 

A government survey in 1995 found that 80 percent of Busia's residents knew that AIDS was a fatal disease contracted primarily through sexual contact. 

Busia's most popular hotel displays AIDS information booklets. Residents hear about AIDS on the radio. Huge signs around town warn people to protect themselves. 

One, along the main road that threads through Busia, reads: "Don't be fooled. AIDS is not witchcraft. AIDS is real. Avoid sex before marriage. Stick to one partner or use a condom." 

Sometimes the message gets through. 

The Mubweka family experienced the reality of AIDS in the early 1990s, after the disease felled Richard Mubweka — husband, father, government worker. The stout, friendly man began fainting and vomiting blood in October 1993. Six months later he was dead. 

Today his grave, with its flat, cracked concrete and brittle wooden cross, lies behind the widow's house. Tall grass has sprouted around the grave, so that it is almost invisible even from a few feet away. 

Days before his death, Richard Mubweka, who had three wives told his relatives that he had AIDS. And he said he did not want his wife, Gertrude, inherited. 

His family has thus far honored that request. And Gertrude Mubweka, 40, has managed just fine, in large part because she has a steady job and owns property. 

Her job as a primary schoolteacher brings in about $80 a month, and Richard left her with 11o acres of land. 

The widow lives in a two-room concrete home, where foam stuffing spills out of her couches and chairs. A black briefcase straining with books and papers rests on one chair. A picture of a healthy Richard hangs on a nail in the living room. 

Gertrude, gray hair tight on her scalp, is furious at women who give in to inheritance. She equates them to prostitutes and murderers. 

"If someone tried to inherit me, I wouldn't accept," says Mubweka, her bright brown eyes turning angry. "I don't want to be a killer of many. If I have been alone since 1994, when don't I keep on?" 

Her four older children — ages 19, 18, 17 and 15 — know she has AIDS. She has been open about the disease and has admonished them "to be careful in their choosing of partners. . . . I warn them about the outcome of romance." 

Unlike many widows, Mubweka has kept her children in school. Only the 19-year-old, who has finished school, and her 4-year-old son are not in classes. 

"Only educating people" will help smother wife inheritance, she says, standing outside her home one morning. "People say [wife inheritance] is from our great-grandfathers, we must do it. It will go away only as the older generation leaves us." 

Then she hurries inside. She must head off to school. 

Reuters 

July 2 , 2001

Kenya's Moi Says Hang Deliberate Spreaders of AIDS

NAIROBI (Reuters) - Kenyan President Daniel arap Moi has demanded the death penalty for people  who knowingly infect others with HIV (news - web sites)/AIDS (news - web sites), to deter men from  passing the disease to vulnerable younger women, newspapers reported on Sunday.

 ``We have to make laws that restrict those who deliberately infect others because young girls cannot  protect themselves from such criminals,'' Moi told reporters on his return from last week's major  United Nations (news - web sites) AIDS conference in New York.

 ``The time has come for those who deliberately infect others to die and those who rape to get life,'' the  Sunday Nation quoted Moi as saying.

 Researchers say infection rates among young African women are far higher than for males, partly due to their vulnerability to older men who use their dominant social and economic status to pressure them  into unprotected sex.

 Moi blamed the church for not doing enough to educate Christians about the dangers of the virus, which has infected about 2.2 million of Kenya's estimated 30 million people, saying the best defence against AIDS was ``good morals.''

 ``If 80% of Kenyans are Christian, why is AIDS spreading this fast?'' he said.

 Kenya's government passed a law in June to allow the import and manufacture of cheap medicines to combat HIV/AIDS, but researchers note that the east African country still lags behind some of its neighbours in facing up to the devastating illness.

 Moi said the government would review Kenya's laws to deal with people guilty of knowingly passing on the virus and introduce tougher penalties for rapists.


THE NEW YORK TIMES

June 28, 2001

A Missing AIDS Lifeline

By BOB HERBERT

The AIDS virus is surging across South Africa like a tidal wave, and yet — incredibly — condoms in South Africa are not easy to obtain. Teenage South Africans, half of whom could be wiped out by AIDS, have a particularly difficult time getting condoms.

"They're not that accessible," said Judi Fortuin, who is an official with a program called loveLife, which attempts to bring comprehensive H.I.V. prevention programs to young people in South Africa.

She said studies had shown that most South Africans have their first sexual encounter around 14 or 15 years of age. At the current rate of infection, half of them will eventually contract the virus. But if a couple of 15-year-olds were to walk into the average South African clinic and ask for condoms, Ms. Fortuin said, "I can almost guarantee that they will be severely chastised and thrown out."

She said health care workers would almost certainly tell the youngsters they had no business even thinking about sex at their age. "They would say, `How dare you? You want a condom? You want me to condone that?' "

So the youngsters forgo the condoms.

LoveLife is the world's largest H.I.V. prevention effort specifically aimed at teenagers and young adults. It is jointly funded by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the South African government.

Its message — upbeat, not downbeat — is being promoted with the kind of high-profile media intensity that is usually associated with the launching of a major commercial brand. LoveLife trumpets attractive, healthy lifestyles and talks about the "extraordinary opportunity" that exists to stem the tide of H.I.V.

Folded into this pop culture campaign is a relentless "sexual health" education effort, with the emphasis on AIDS prevention. And loveLife is helping to establish a wide network of properly accredited clinics and other services that welcome and embrace the young people growing up in the midst of the epidemic.

A measure of the need for such a program (loveLife is about two years old) can be seen in the startling fact that more than 95 percent of South Africans are aware of the AIDS epidemic, but the use of condoms to reduce the risk of becoming infected has not appreciably changed over the past decade.

There are myriad cultural issues involved.

Michael Sinclair, a senior vice president with the Kaiser Family Foundation, said, "We know from past failed attempts that talking about death and dying doesn't work terribly well with young people. And particularly with young people growing up in relatively impoverished environments — for whom disease and even death are not all that unusual."

Even for older, relatively affluent South Africans there is often a reluctance to walk into a store and buy condoms. "There is still a social stigma attached to it," said Ms. Fortuin. "People tend to frown on a public display of sexual activity, and purchasing a condom exposes one to the staff that works there."

Another problem is the terrible imbalance of power that characterizes relations between the genders. The rites of sexual passage are often brutally unfair. Many South African women and girls are forced to have sex the first time, said Ms. Fortuin.

"It depends on how you break up the research," she said. "But your average statistic in South Africa is that one in four women's first sexual encounter is a coerced encounter. And that is by men that they know, and men that they don't know."

There is not much time left for loveLife and other agencies throughout South Africa — including the government — to get a handle on this disease that has hit southern Africa harder than any other spot on the planet.

More than 4 million South Africans — out of a population of 43 million — are currently infected with the virus. Infections among those 15 to 20 years old are increasing at an annual rate of 65 percent. Without dramatic changes, more than 10 million South Africans will be infected in less than 10 years, and the life expectancy for those under 35 will be cut in half.
 


THE NEW YORK TIMES

June 27, 2001

U.N. United in AIDS Fight but Split Over 

What to Do

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER


UNITED NATIONS, June 26 — While a special session of the United Nations grasps this week for a show of unity on the worldwide AIDS epidemic, participants are divided among hundreds of different views on how to approach the problem, how to spend the money promised for a global AIDS fund and even who should take part in the debate.

Those differences have played out in ways both dramatic and small during the special session, which began here on Monday.

Twenty years after AIDS first began to take its toll, officials could not agree on which groups they should even proclaim at risk. Because of objections by Islamic delegates, debate continued over whether to mention gays and prostitutes — groups long acknowledged to have been hit hardest by the disease — in the official declaration. A draft of the declaration, scheduled for a General Assembly vote on Wednesday, urges all countries to protect the rights of people with AIDS. [Page A10.]

At the outset, the special assembly was sidetracked with a lengthy and acrimonious debate over whether a representative from a gay group should be permitted to participate in a roundtable discussion (nearly a dozen assembly members opposed it, with a Malaysian delegate openly condemning the eventual decision to include the representative).

Outside the assembly's formal sessions, small conference rooms are filled with accounts of the devastation of AIDS around the world, the underlying causes of its spread in certain countries and the implied competing interests over how a proposed $9 billion pot of new money to fight AIDS globally will be distributed.

Indeed, while the official debate has centered largely around the cost of AIDS drugs and their availability, most people outside the official delegations are more concerned with addressing the basic problems that have contributed to or resulted from AIDS: a lack of even rudimentary health clinics in districts of Nepal where thousands have died from diarrhea; grandmothers in Uganda who have no income and are raising a half dozen orphans, many of them infected with AIDS; widespread starvation in various African villages where everyone who used to farm the crops is either dead or sick.

"There has been an overemphasis in this conference about drugs," said Vijay Rajkumar, a Nepal-based AIDS adviser for Save the Children. "The lack of drinking water is a much bigger priority in most countries than anti-retroviral treatments."

The wide chasm between those who write policies and pay for programs and those who have to make them work on the ground is as old as the international development field itself. But the stakes have never been as high: AIDS has killed nearly 22 million people worldwide, and infection rates are rising rapidly in many countries.

This session, the first that the United Nations has devoted to a health care subject, has made it clear that stemming AIDS requires complex and sensitive strategies that vary greatly from country to country, perhaps frustrating Secretary General Kofi Annan's plea to "combine leadership, partnership and solidarity."

What to do about Mauritania, for instance, where condoms are all but illegal? What about rural Kenya, where the practice of passing wives down from one infected brother to another is common in some villages with high illiteracy among women? "We are looking for solutions like everyone else," said Jane Mumbi Kiano, who represents the National Council of Women of Kenya. "You have all kinds of posters but some of our women cannot read or write. We are very concerned about this global fund."

The clashes among cultures became evident on the first day of the session. Besides the scuffle over the representative from the gay group, trouble immediately erupted when the official delegation began its central task of working out a universal "declaration of commitment" on the fight against AIDS. Some Islamic countries quickly objected because a draft of the declaration included gays and prostitutes in the groups of people particularly at risk for contracting the disease.

The issue created heat in the hallways and in the Café Vienna, the smoke-filled cafeteria where visitors deconstruct the day's events. A woman with a large floppy hat who identified herself simply as Pamela carried around a sign condemning the exclusion of sex workers from the proposed declaration. Equally concerned was Roma Debabrata, who runs an organization in India to stop the sexual trafficking of women and children. "The language is a problem," Ms. Debabrata said. "You must be absolutely clear, with no side tracking about who needs intervention in this draft."

And while some groups drew controversy, others seem to have been largely ignored. For instance, when most health organizations tally up those who are most at risk for AIDS, they tend to identify sexually active people as those under 49 years. Safe- sex literature tends to be written for younger people and distributed in places where they congregate. "People over 50 are not considered sexual beings," said Paul Godfred, a training adviser from HelpAge International, citing a town in Thailand where 394 people out of 4,000 with H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS, are over 60. Mr. Godfred recalled an education session for older people in India where the group addressed asked for condoms. Confused but agreeable, the AIDS worker brought a basket the next day, and they immediately disappeared.

Death is often only the beginning of the problems for communities in some of the world's poorest nations, especially the elderly. In much of Asia and Africa, the elderly are often left to care for their grandchildren orphaned by AIDS, without the financial support of their own children, now dead, that they had counted on all their lives. Many are widowed and with few resources. Livestock is often sold to pay for medications and funerals. When children die, government subsidies to care for them end too.

AIDS has also created other public health problems that require vast resources, like widespread hunger among the rural poor. The United Nation's Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that roughly seven million agricultural workers with AIDS have died since the mid- 1980's, leaving hunger and economic devastation; in Kenya, for instance, between 49 percent and 78 percent of household income is lost when one person with AIDS dies.

Poverty in rural areas in turn leads to the spread of H.I.V., as men seek work in cities and contract the virus and women turn to prostitution themselves as a means of income. Prevention messages, an area where much AIDS money is spent, are often inconsistent with the way people live. "The rural poor are impervious to traditional prevention methods," said Gary Howe, the director of the International Fund for Agricultural Development in the East and Southern African division.

In official speeches from the delegates, there is vague language about cultural sensitivity in safe-sex literature. But the causes of the spread of AIDS are often so specific to a particular country that they defy any global solution. In Kenya, wife inheritance and genital mutilation with shared needles has been a contributing factor, said Ida B. Odinga, from that nation's League of Women Voters. Mali Bent Sidi, a women's rights worker in Mauritania, described how the sharing of needles to pierce children's ears had contributed to the spread of AIDS, as well as an almost official ban on condoms.

Many groups said that discussions about anti-retroviral drugs was highly irrelevant in many areas where there are no clinics to distribute them, no clean water or food to take them with and a lack of even basic antibiotics to stave off the less onerous infections that stem from H.I.V.

All of these concerns need money, and many of the nongovernment groups feared that the new money that world leaders have called for to stop AIDS will get sucked up by administrative costs, corrupt governments and the single area of AIDS drugs. "I fear that a major chunk of the global health fund will go to drugs," said Mr. Rajkumar, of Nepal. "And that means money for drug companies and not for infrastructure."

Using local groups familiar with the problems of their region is a long- held practice by the United Nations, but many fear that the flow of money will not come their way. "International AIDS agencies have come with money before and it all goes to overhead and not where it belongs," said Pearl Nswahili, founder of STOP AIDS in Nigeria. "This meeting has huge talk but not a lot of action.

"There are lots of documents," she added, but "we still don't have any condoms."
 


 I LIVE IN AFRICA
AND DON'T WONNA
DIE OF AIDS
GIMMI YOUR HAND

EVER HEARD ABOUT
HIV INFECTED MZEES (ELDERS) HAVING MONOPOLY
TO DEFLORATE?

EVER HEARD ABOUT
RUPTURED VAGINAS
BECAUSE OF ASHES PUT
INSIDE TO INCREASE
MAN'S PLEASURE?

EVER HEARD ABOUT
FEMALE CIRCUMCISION?
WISH TO BE SUBJECT
TO INFIBULATION OR INTROCISION? WISH THIS FOR YOUR SISTER, WIFE, OR DAUGHTER?

Female Circumcision

Type 1
Cutting the clitoral prepuce circumferetially

Type 2
Removing the glans clitoris or the entire clitoris 
and the labia minora partially or entirely

Type 3: Infibulation "pharaonic way"
Removing the clitoris, the labia minora and majora.
The raw edges of the wounds are sewn together 
leaving a tiny opening for urination and menstruation

Type 4: Introcision
     Enlarging the vaginal opening by cutting the perineum


I LIVE IN AFRICA. WHO IS GOING TO PROTECT MY HUMAN RIGHTS?

"Europe is not in the business of preaching and imposing its culture on other countries and nations. However, Europe must be very clear in defending its values which are built around justice, equality of the sexes and human rights. Therefore, we cannot  tolerate that within our borders, a cultural practice becomes an excuse for the violation of fundamental human rights. Irrational traditional practices do not have a place in modern societies, especially since they are aimed at continuing to subjugate women. The global community has clearly itself to human rights and this is reflected both in conventions and international agreements." 

Anna Diamantopoulou, European Commissioner responsible for gender equality, on special European Parliament hearing on female genital mutilation among African  immigrants, 30 November, 2000 

I LIVE IN AFRICA AND DON'T WONNA DIE OF AIDS GIMMI YOUR HAND GIMMI

Vicky Rimmer
Vicky Rimmer
 her tragic story

Anonymous kigori
Anonymous kigori
her tragic story

Until the spring of 1993, Vicky Rimmer was an average Welsh teenager who loved hamburgers, rock music and shopping with friends more than studying for school.  Then, suddenly,
the mysterious symptoms started:. Vicky was the first teenager to be diagnosed in as suffering from suspected CJD - Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease. She fell sick in 1993 and had lain in a deep coma for more than four years, died in hospital on Friday, November 21, 1997.
more

Kigori (in kiswahili) means an adolescent girl, almost of marriageable age. A few years ago she took part in mkinda -  dance used in young girls' initiation ceremony followed by cutting off part of her genitals with a rust-eaten knife. Pain made her unconscious, she almost died of severe bleeding , but survived. The mutilation left scars affecting everything in her life, even walking. Now she is preparing for marriage. Before that she will be forced to be deflorated by one of the village's elders. All of them have ukimwi - AIDS. 
more

what the other people did in 1996 to prevent more suffering when  not more than  10 cases of nvCJD  had been identified in people aged under 42?
see here

what the other people did in 2001 to prevent more suffering when much more than  25,3 mllion  people living with HIV/AIDS had been estimated in Sub-Saharan Africa?
see here


more readings:
 

Jomo Kenyatta
Facing Mount Kenya: The Tribal Life of the Kikuyu, London, 1938

CHAPTER 6 INITIATION OF BOYS AND GIRLS
(...)

No proper Gikuyu would dream of marrying a girl who has not been circumcised, and vice versa. It is taboo for a Gikuyu man or woman to have sexual relations with someone who has not undergone this operation. If it happens, a man or woman must go through a ceremonial purification, korutwo thahu or gotahikio megiro–namely, ritual vomiting of the evil deeds. A few detribalised Gikuyu, while they are away from home for some years, have thought fit to denounce the custom and to marry uncircumcised girls, especially from coastal tribes, thinking that they could bring them back to their fathers' homes without offending the parents. But to their surprise they found that their fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters, following the tribal custom, are not prepared to welcome as a relative-in-law anyone who has not fulfilled the ritual qualifications for matrimony. Therefore a problem has faced these semi-detribalised Gikuyu when they wanted to return to their homeland. Their parents have demanded that if their sons wished to settle down and have the blessings of the family and the clan, they must divorce the wife married outside the rigid tribal custom and then marry a girl with the approved tribal qualifications. Failing this, they have been turned out and disinherited.

(...)

PREPARING FOR INITIATION

About a fortnight before the day of initiation the girl is put on a special diet, namely, njahi and ngima ya ogembe composed of a particular kind of Gikuyu bean (njahe), and together with a stiff porridge made of a small kind of grain (ogembe) ground into flour and mixed with water and oil. This diet is used in order to prevent the loss of blood at the time of initiation (physical operation) and also to ensure immediate healing of the wound, as well as a precaution against blood poisoning. The girl is properly taken care of by her sponsor, motiiri, who examines her and gives her all necessary instructions about the initiation ceremony. In this examination attention is directed to ascertaining that the girl is not near maturity and that menstruation is not likely to begin for at least a month after irua and the healing of the wound. She is also closely questioned to verify that she never bad sexual intercourse or indulged in masturbation. If she has broken any of the prohibitions of the Gikuyu social codes, the girl makes a confession to the motiiri, who reports the confession to the girl's parents. 

(...)

HOW THE GIRL IS OPERATED ON
(...)
Each of the girls sits down with her legs wide open on the hide. Her sponsor sits behind her with her legs interwoven with those of the girl, so as to keep the girl's legs in a steady open position. The girl reclines gently against her sponsor or motiiri, who holds her slightly on the shoulders to prevent any bodily movement, the girl meanwhile staring skywards. After this an elderly woman, attached to the ceremonial council, comes in with very cold water, which has been preserved through the night with a steel axe in it. This water is called mae maithanwa (axe water). The water is thrown on the girl's sexual organ to make it numb and to arrest profuse bleeding as well as to shock the girl’s nerves at the time, for she is not supposed to show any fear or make any audible sign of emotion or even to blink. To do so would be considered cowardice (kerogi) and make her the butt of ridicule among her companions. For this reason she is expected to keep her eyes fixed upwards until the operation is completed.

When this preparation is finished, a woman specialist, known as moruithia, who has studied this form of surgery from childhood, dashes out of the crowd, dressed in a very peculiar way, with her face painted with white and black ochre. This disguise tends to make her look rather terrifying, with her rhythmic movement accompanied by the rattles tied to her legs. She takes out from her pocket (moondo) the operating Gikuyu razor (rwenji), and in quick movements, and with the dexterity of a Harley Street surgeon, proceeds to operate upon the girls. With a stroke she cuts off the tip of the clitoris (rong'otho). As no other part of the girl's sexual organ is interfered with, this completes the girl's operation. Immediately the old woman who originally threw the water on the girls comes along with milk mixed with some herbs called mokengeria and ndogamoki, which she sprinkles on the fresh wound to reduce the pain and to check bleeding, and prevent festering or blood poisoning. In a moment each girl is covered with a new dress (cloak) by her sponsor. At this juncture the silence is broken and the crowd begins to sing joyously in these words: "Ciana citto ire kooma ee-ho, nea marerire-ee-ho,” which means: "Our children are brave, ee-ho (hurrah). Did anyone cry? No one cried--- hurrah!"

After this the sponsors hold the girls by the arms and slowly walk to a special hut which has been prepared for the girls. Here the girls are put to sleep on beds prepared on the ground with sweet-smelling leaves called marerecwa, mataathi and maturanguru. The two first mentioned are used for keeping flies away or any other insect, and also to purify the air and counteract any bad smell which may be caused by the wounds, while the last-named is purely a ceremonial herb. The leaves are changed almost daily by the sponsors who are assigned to look after the needs of the initiates (irui). For the first few days no visitors are allowed to see the girls, and the sponsors take great care to see that no unauthorized person approaches the hut. It is feared that if someone with evil eyes (gethemengo) sees the girls it will result in illness.

HEALING OF THE WOUND

At the time of the surgical operation the girl hardly feels any pain for the simple reason that her limbs have been numbed, and the operation is over before she is conscious of it. It is only when she awakes after three or four hours of rest that she begins to realize that something has been done to her genital organ. The writer has learned this fact from several girls (relatives and close friends) who have gone through the initiation and who belong to the sane age-group with the writer.

When the girl wakes up the nurse who is in attendance washes her with some kind of watery herb called mahoithia (drainers or dryers). After the washing the wound is attended with antiseptic and healing leaves called kagutwi or matei (chasers or banishers). The leaves are folded together, about two inches long, hall an inch wide and a quarter of an inch thick; then they are dipped in oil, maguta ma mbarikii (Gikuyu castor oil), to prevent their sticking on the wound and also to prevent the wound from shrinking. The bandage is then placed on the wound between labia majora to keep the two lips apart and prevent them from being drawn together  while the wound heals.

The girl sits down with her legs closed together so as to keep the bandage in position. Frequently the girl is carefully examined by the nurse, and whenever she urinates, the nurse is there ready to clean the wound and put on a new bandage. The 
(...)
The wound normally requires a week to heal, but of course, there are some cases which take longer, generally due to negligence on the part of the girl or the nurse in applying the healing leaves in the proper way. Such cases are few, but result in a septic condition, and the formation of much scar tissue on the area of the labia majora, which may make childbirth difficult. Cases of this nature sometimes find their way to hospitals and attract the attention of both the missionary and official doctors, who then and there, without careful investigation of the system of female circumcision, attack the custom of clitoridectomy in general, asserting that it is barbaric and a menace to the life of the mothers. To strengthen their attacks on this custom, these "well-wishers" have gone so far as to state that almost every first child dies as a result of this operation at the time of initiation, and that the operation is more severe today than it was formerly. Irresponsible statements of this kind are not to be taken too seriously, for it must not be forgotten that very few of the normal cases of childbirth ever come to the notice of European doctors. 
 

Contemporary edition:
Kenyatta, Jomo 1965 Facing Mt. Kenya. 
New York: Vintage Books. pp 125-149. 

From the book cover: 

Jomo Kenyatta, the grandson of a Kikuyu medicine man, was among the foremost leaders of African nationalism and one of the great men of the modern world. In the 1930’s he studied at the London School of Economics and took his degree in anthropology under Bronislaw Malinowski, one result of which is this now famous account of his own Kikuyu tribe. 

Note: Professor Bronislaw Malinowski was the world famous anthropologist and ethnographer. In 1934 he arrived to East Africa to study social and cultural relations of Kukuyu, Chagga, Masaai and other tribes. See: The Anthropology and Changing African Cultures (1938), The Dynamics and Cultural Change: An Inquiry into Race Relations in Africa (1945). 

 

The Nation,  November 10, 2002


Young woman steps up poetic drive against Aids

 By TONY MOCHAMA

The tall young woman strides the stage with confidence and grace, her voice melodic and passionate as she recites:- "Let the word go forth, to friend and foe alike, that it is a new day! Let there be, in this place and elsewhere – no-one faithless, no-one careless, no predator..."

Her name is Pamela Ateka and the predator she is fighting worldwide is Aids (Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome). Her crusade against the epidemic (said to have claimed at least 24 million lives in sub-Saharan Africa) has taken Ateka places, from the community-based organisation of dusty Kayole, Nairobi, to the conference halls of exotic Egypt.

Pamela has worked with HIV positive women in WOFAK (Women Fighting Aids in Kenya) and rubbed shoulders with the high, such as former South African President Nelson Mandela, and the mighty, like Mr J.P. Garnier, Chief Executive Officer of GlaxoSmithKline.

Anyone watching the special programme, Staying Alive, on the Barcelona Aids Conference in early July (that was aired on Nation TV on Kenyatta Day) would have recognised Pamela – tall, dark and smooth-skinned – as she listened intently to former American President Bill Clinton eloquently state what needs to be done by the world to fight the greatest predator of humanity in the late 20th and early 21st Century.

Pamela's weapon of choice is her God-given talents to create community awareness, not just about the disease but also about other problems "such as environmental and political malaise."

She adds: "Poetry is my armoury against Aids, but I also tell narrative oral tales to communicate against ethnic hatred and in-fighting."

 Prefer being told stories

But why use art – poetry and story-telling – to communicate her message instead of simply telling it as it is?

"We Africans prefer being told stories and vitendawilis, as opposed to dry prose and hard facts. By using poetry, my audiences find our anti-Aids messages easier to conceive, chew, swallow and digest."

She has been to several countries to represent her community of Urban Kayole ? and to also spread the message that "No carelessness + no faithlessness = No Predator."

From the beautiful capes of Cape Town (where she met Mandela) to the dry and sunny desert-scapes of Alexandria, where she attended a Youth Employment Summit, she has taken that message.

Pamela is grateful to the GTZ (German Technical Co-operation) for the YES (Youth Employment Summit) that " was called to call for youth action against global joblessness".

Africa's problems, she says, are all inter-twined, the one blending into the other. "We cannot discuss them as separate entities or endemics."

She was a delegate at the last OAU policy meeting convened to draft a plan of action against ageing – although the Pandora's Box of Aids may, paradoxically, make longevity the least of Africa's problems.

The poetess has touched elbows with many interesting and amusing fellows. They include renowned CNN journalist Charles Hodgson and Hollywood actor Rupert Everett (who played the gay guy, George, in the 1999 Julia Roberts mega-hit, My Best Friend's Wedding).

In one of life's unhappy coincidences, Everett, 28, actually happens to be gay in real-life, an anti-Aids activist and one of Pamela's favourite personalities.

The famous actor sees the Church as part of the problem because expecting all to abstain from sex 'inexplicably naive."

While praising the countrywide VCT initiative (Voluntary Counselling and Testing centres), Pamela would rather the campaign shifted more to infected and affected people leading positive lifestyles as opposed to local celebrities blandly telling the youth that maisha itakuwa poa (life will be fine) once you have discovered your status.

Pamela says: "VCTs are relying on the idea that people want to know their status so that they do not spread the disease, but with most HIV positive people in Africa unable to afford three square meals a day, with most of them unemployed or being re-trenched shortly after they fall sick, with the stigma and discrimination that come with the Aids, there is very little incentive to go find out one's status."

It is the gravity of this problem that brought Pamela (and 200 others from all over the world) face-to-face with Mr Clinton at the Barcelona Aids conference in July.

Pamela says: "Clinton was very eloquent about the Aids problem, very knowledgeable. He showed how it is not only a sub-Saharan tragedy but one on the Indian sub-continent, too. Clinton raised the alarm on the explosive threat Aids poses to China, Russia and Cuba, the way all the world's hemispheres are under a fierce threat."

The former US President urged Western governments and multi-national pharmaceuticals to wake up fully to the danger of Aids and do more, in pricing, aid and research-and-development, for poorer nations.

Mr Clinton may have been polished in his passion but it was the grand old statesman of Africa, Mandela, who won Pamela's heart in past February.

 A poignant story

Says she: "I was down in Cape Town to discuss 'Human Rights and HIV status'. Mandela was charismatic, mesmerising. He told us a poignant story of a young lady whom he helped support through high school and college, who recently died of Aids."

The Kenyan anti-Aids crusader's own passion is partially fuelled by the death from the scourge of her elder sister, at only 30.

Pamela's eyes cloud over as she recalls her sister's final days ... a hunched little figure on a woven mat on a bare floor. She often massaged her into the small hours in a futile attempt to ease the pain coursing through her frail body.

During the interview with Lifestyle at Maision Francaise, Nairobi, Pamela recalled those dark days with a load of sadness.

This may be the end of day but the beginning of hope if all people realised, as Pamela has, that although not necessarily infected, we are all affected in one way or the other by the worst plague to ever plague humanity – since the London rats of 1666 and the Spanish Flu of 1922.

"We must fight it with all we got, bare-knuckled," Pamela says. Her knuckle-dusters, it seems, are lines of poetry.
 


People living with HIV/AIDS Per cent of adults age 15 - 49  1999
Ranking of 41 countries in which the rate exceeded 2.0%

People living with HIV/AIDS Per cent of adults age 15 - 49 1999
 

A SHARE OF PEOPLE LIVING IN THE NINE COUNTRIES
OF EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA
(BOTSWANA, KENYA, LESOTHO, MALAWI, NAMIBIA,
SOUTH AFRICA, SWAZILAND, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE)
IN DEMOGRAPHY AND HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC OF THE WORLD AND SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

A SHARE OF PEOPLE LIVING IN THE NINE COUNTRIES

PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
IN THE NINE COUNTRIES OF EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA (BOTSWANA, KENYA, LESOTHO, MALAWI, NAMIBIA,
SOUTH AFRICA, SWAZILAND, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE)
IN 1997 AND 1999
PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
AMONG ALL ADULTS AGE 15 - 49

PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
 
  


Universal Sign Language: VIRGINITY MATTERS

VIRGINITY MATTERS
Universal Sign Language
Shy? Show, Don't Tell

THE JOHN SNOW INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR COMMON SENSE IN PUBLIC HEALTH

THE JOHN SNOW INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY
for common sense  in public health

THE JOHN SNOW INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY

Afro-European Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention Network
A-E STDs PN

Afro-European Sexually Transmitted Diseases Prevention Network (A-ESTDsPN)



Afro-European Cooperation Deficiency Syndrome Kills


Afro-European Cooperation Deficiency Syndrome





Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention
according to mainstream science of medical epidemiology

here

Virgins until Marriage 
Civil Society Organization 
of the African Union and the European Union

Virgins until Marriage - Civil Society Organization of the African Union and the European Union global virginology virginology.org

Virgins until Marriage - Civil Society Organization of the African Union and the European Union عذراء حتى الزواج -- منظمات المجتمع المدني من الاتحاد الافريقي والاتحاد الاوروبي Maagde tot het Huwelik - Civil Society Organisasie van die Afrika Unie en die Europese Unie Virgjër deri Martesa - Organizata të Shoqërisë Civile të Bashkimit Afrikan dhe Bashkimi Evropian Կույսեր մինչեւ Հարսանիք - ին Քաղաքացիական հասարակության կազմակերպում Աֆրիկյան Միության եւ Եվրոպական Միության Bakirə qədər nigah - Vətəndaş Cəmiyyəti Təşkilatı Afrika İttifaqı və Avropa Birliyi Birjin arte Ezkontza - Civil Society de Afrikako Batasunaren eta Europako Batasunaren Erakundea Нявінніца да шлюбу - Грамадзянскае грамадства Арганізацыя Афрыканскага саюза і Еўрапейскага саюза Девственици до брак - Гражданско общество Организация на Африканския съюз и на Европейския съюз Verges fins el matrimoni - Organització de la Societat Civil de la Unió Africana i la Unió Europea Virginitat fins al matrimoni - Organització de la Societat Civil de la Unió Africana i la Unió Europea 直到婚姻处女 - 民间社会组织,非洲联盟和欧洲联盟 Djevica do Brak - organizacija civilnog društva od Afričke unije i Europske unije Panice a panny do manželství - Občanská společnost Organizace Africké unie a Evropská unie Jomfruer indtil ægteskabet - en Civilsamfundet Organisationen for Den Afrikanske Union og Den Europæiske Union Maagde tot het Huwelijk - Civil Society Organisatie van de Afrikaanse Unie en de Europese Unie Imb enne abielu - kodanikuühiskonna organisatsiooni Aafrika Liidu ja Euroopa Liit Virgins hanggang Kasal - Civil Society Organization ng African Union at ng mga European Union Vierges jusqu'au mariage - Organisation de la société civile de l'Union africaine et l'Union européenne Virxes ata o matrimonio - Organización da sociedade civil da Unión Africana e da Unión ვირგო სანამ ქორწილი - სამოქალაქო საზოგადოების ორგანიზაცია აფრიკის კავშირის და ევროპის კავშირი Europea Jungfrauen bis Ehe- Zivilgesellschaftlichen Organisation der Afrikanischen Union und der Europäischen Union Παρθένες μέχρι Γάμος - Κοινωνία των πολιτών Οργάνωση της Αφρικανικής Ένωσης και της Ευρωπαϊκής Ένωσης Vyèrj jiskaske Maryaj - Sosyete Sivil Òganizasyon nan Inyon Afriken ak Inyon Ewopeyen an בתולות עד החתונה - חברה אזרחית ארגון האיחוד האפריקאי והאיחוד האירופי Bikirori har aure, aikin jam'iyyoyi ƙungiyar gamayyar afurka da Kungiyar Tarayyar Turai शादी तक कुंवारी - सिविल सोसायटी अफ्रीकी संघ और यूरोपीय संघ के संगठन Szüzek, amíg Házasság - Civil Társadalom Szervezete, az Afrikai Unió és az Európai Unió Meyjar þar Hjónaband - Borgaraleg Samfélag Samtök Afríkuríkja sambandsins og Evrópusambandið Perawan sampai Pernikahan - Organisasi Masyarakat Sipil Uni Afrika dan Uni Eropa Maighdeana go dtí Pósadh - le Sochaí Sibhialta Eagraíocht an Aontas na hAfraice agus an Aontais Eorpaigh Vergini fino al matrimonio - Organizzazione della società civile dell'Unione africana e l'Unione Europea 結婚するまで処女-市民社会組織は、アフリカ連合と欧州連 合の 결혼하기 전까지 처녀 - 시민 사회 조직 아프리카 연합과 유럽 연합의 Jaunavas līdz Marriage - pilsoniskās sabiedrības organizācijas no Āfrikas Savienības un Eiropas Savienība Девици се до брак - граѓанското општество Организација на Африканската унија и Европската унија Merginos iki vedybų - pilietinės visuomenės organizacijos ir Afrikos Sąjunga ir Europos Sąjunga Perawan sampai Pernikahan - Pertubuhan Masyarakat Sivil Kesatuan Afrika dan Kesatuan Eropah Verġni sakemm Żwieġ - Soċjetà Ċivili Organizzazzjoni ta 'l-Unjoni Afrikana u l-Unjoni Ewropea Jomfruer inntil Ekteskap - Civil Society Organization Den afrikanske union og EU تا زمان ازدواج باکره -- جامعه مدنی ، سازمان اتحادیه آفریقا واتحادیه اروپا Dziewice aż do małżeństwa - Organizacja społeczeństwa obywatelskiego Unii Afrykańskiej i Unii Europejskiej Virgens até o Casamento - Organização da Sociedade Civil da União Africana e da União Europeia Virgine pînă la căsătorie - Societatea civilă Organizaţia Uniunii Africane şi a Uniunii Europene Девственницы до брака - Гражданское общество Организация Африканского союза и Европейского союза Девица до брак - Цивилно друштво Организација Афричке уније и Европске уније Panice a panny do manželstva - Občianska spoločnosť Organizácie Africkej únie a Európska únia Device do poroke - Civilna družba Organizacije Afriške unije in Evropsko unijo Vírgenes hasta el matrimonio - Organización de la Sociedad Civil de la Unión Africana y la Unión Europea Wanawali mpaka Ndoa - Civil Society Organization wa Umoja wa Afrika na Umoja wa Ulaya Oskulder tills Äktenskap - Civila samhället organisation av Afrikanska unionen och Europeiska unionen สาวพรหมจรรย์จนกว่าจะแต่งงาน - โยธา สังคม องค์กรของสหภาพแอฟริกาและสหภาพยุโรป Evlilik kadar Bakireler - Sivil Toplum Örgütü Afrika Birliği ve Avrupa Birliği Діви до шлюбу - Громадянське суспільство Організація Африканського союзу і Європейського союзу Trinh nữ cho đến Hôn nhân - Xã hội dân sự tổ chức của Liên minh châu Phi và Liên minh châu Âu Gwyryfon nes priodas - Cymdeithas Sifil Sefydliad yr Undeb Affricanaidd a'r Undeb Ewropeaidd יונגפרויען ביז חתונה - סיוויל געזעלשאַפֿט ארגאניזאציע פון די אפריקאנער פֿאַרבאַנד און דעם אייראָפּעישן פֿאַרבאַנד Virgins until Marriage - Civil Society Organization of the African Union and the European Union




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